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Is Your Computer Fan Going Crazy? CC Libraries Might be the Cause


In the heat of the summer, I usually enjoy having a fan blowing on my desk. But I’m not so keen on the fan inside my laptop blowing at top speed. It seems like a sign of distress, especially if I don’t know the cause. There are several reasons why your computer fan might start blowing at top speed, ranging from blocked air vents to malware. Most likely, your CPU is just doing some very intense calculations and needs to dissipate the resulting heat.

But recently I’ve experienced high fan speeds when I’m not asking my computer to do anything in particular. I have the usual Adobe apps open but I’m not working on any documents. One reason this might be happening has to do with Creative Cloud Libraries, which do a lot of their work in the background.

As this article on Adobe.com describes, you can use the Task Manager on Windows or Activity Monitor on macOS to try and root out the issue. If you find that the process called CEPHtmlEngine Helper is using most of your CPU capacity, then CC Libraries may be the culprit.

The article details two possible solutions. One involves fixing permissions for a log file, and the other will have you doing a little brain surgery inside the Adobe application packages to replace some folders related to CC Libraries. I performed the latter on my machine and haven’t seen the fan issue since.

You need to replace the contents of this folder.

The Adobe article (dated March 2019) also mentions that they were planning to address the problem in a future update, though I went through all the release notes since then and didn’t find mention of it. In any case, if your computer’s fan inexplicably seems to think you’re working in the middle of the Sahara desert at high noon, try the fix in the Adobe article.

More after the jump! Continue reading below
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Editor in Chief of CreativePro and InDesign Magazine. Instructor at LinkedIn Learning with courses on InDesign, Illustrator, GIMP, Inkscape, and Affinity Publisher.
  • Frans Van der Geest says:

    Right! I have this, will try the duggested solutions.

  • Frans Van der Geest says:

    Suggested

  • Pu says:

    Omg just kill the cc library already. Or let us turn it off permanently.

  • Steve Davis says:

    The enclosed article link https://helpx.adobe.com/x-productkb/global/high_cpu_usage_cephtmlengine.html refers to CC2015, I arrived at this page because of serious issues with CEPHtmlEngine Helper inter-alia and would love a way to fix it in CC2020.

    • Mike Rankin says:

      Hi Steve- This does apply to the 2020 versions of Adobe apps. The Adobe article was last updated in 2019, and as I mentioned here, I used the second fix it describes: replacing the content in InDesign: /Applications/Adobe InDesign CC 2015/Resources/CEP/extensions/com.adobe.DesignLibraries.angular/
      This solved the problem for me. Or at least I haven’t seen it since then.

      • F van der Geest says:

        Please take note: No such CEP folder in Resources in 2020. As far as I know they all moved to Application support in Library folder…

      • F van der Geest says:

        Take note: no such CEP folder present in Resources in 2020. As far as I know they moved to the Library folder (Mac).

      • Mike Rankin says:

        I just added a screenshot of the folder in InDesign 2020.

  • Kate Kleiman says:

    This issue has been driving me bonkers for the last several months. However, it appears to have stopped since the latest update. Thanks for posting it.

  • Rob says:

    Am I the only one who cannot find this folder in ID 2020? I see it in ID 2105, but ID 2018 and 2020 do not have it.

    • Rob says:

      Follow up: I went back to the original Adobe.com article and read this under solution #2:
      “You need to select the product executable directly and Ctrl+click it to use the Show Package Contents command to access the product directories listed below.”
      I have no idea what this means. Is this some way to reveal a hidden CEP folder ID 2020? (Like holding the option key to show the Library folder)

  • Rob says:

    Follow up: I went back to the original adobe.com article and in the Solution No. 2 part it says
    “You need to select the product executable directly and Ctrl+click it to use the Show Package Contents command to access the product directories listed below.”
    I have no idea what that means! Is it some way to reveal a hidden CEP folder in ID 2020? (Like clicking option to reveal the Library folder on a Mac)

  • Gregory Hansen says:

    Mike:
    I followed your instructions to use the “fix” in the Adobe article for my new MacBook Pro using ID 2020 under Catalina. It seemed to work for about a week and then went back to the CEPHtmlEngine Helper process using 100% of the CPU and causing the fan speed to go up when I work in InDesign 2020. I see a lot of comments from users on Adobe about this problem, saying the problem for them started with the release of ID 2020. The answer from the Adobe engineers is that they are reviewing this. Do you have any idea when they are going to fix it permanently?
    Greg Hansen
    indesignsecrets member

    • Mike Rankin says:

      Sorry, Greg. I don’t have any more info. But I agree with you. This week I had another incident of the fan going nuts and it was CEPHtmlEngine again. Very annoying. I also have fan issues with Adobe Acrobat on a regular basis. At least Adobe is aware of this problem. Whether they can fix it permanently, we’ll have to wait and see.

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